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Interdisziplinäre Polenstudien. ZIP-Forschungskolloquium

Programm
(Stand 16.05.2018)

07.06.2018 Jun. Prof. Dr. Jannis Panagiotidis (Osnabrück): Emigration, Forced Migration, Iron Curtain:
East European Migration History in the Twentieth Century.

Kolloquium im Rahmen der Summer School of Interdisciplinary Polish and German Studies 2018 “People on the Move in Twentieth Century Europe”
14.06.2018 Julia Reinke (Jena): Political Immigration in State Socialism: Refugees from the Greek Civil War in the GDR and Poland.
Kolloquium im Rahmen der Summer School of Interdisciplinary Polish and German Studies 2018 “People on the Move in Twentieth Century Europe”
21.06.2018 Prof. Keely Stauter-Halsted (Chicago): The Great Unmixing: Refugees, Repatriates and the Definition of Citizenship in the New Poland, 1918-1924.
Kolloquium im Rahmen der Summer School of Interdisciplinary Polish and German Studies 2018 “People on the Move in Twentieth Century Europe” in Kooperation mit Viadrina Center B/ORDERS IN MOTION
28.06.2018 Prof. Vladimir Sacharov und Dr. Tat’iana Timofeeva (Moskau), Dr. Dmytro Burim (Kiew): Kulturgutkonfiskationen in Ostdeutschland, 1944-1948. Ergebnisse trinationaler Grundlagenforschung.
Einleitung und Moderation: Dr. Frank Grelka (Frankfurt/Oder)
05.07.2018 Dr. Peter Polak-Springer (Qatar): Islam and Catholicism in the Making of the Post-World War I Era: Pilgrimages to the Haram Al-Sharif and Jasna Góra in Comparative Perspective.
Kolloquium im Rahmen der Summer School of Interdisciplinary Polish and German Studies 2018 “People on the Move in Twentieth Century Europe”
06.07.2018 Blockkolloquium: Vorstellung aktueller Dissertationsprojekte am ZIP
Freitag, 9:00-15:00 Uhr
12.07.2018 Jessica Kalus und Aleksandra Wągrodzka (Frankfurt/Oder):
Der Deutsch-Polnische Preis als Symbol und Mittel der politischen Kommunikation

Programm als PDF herunterladen

Emigration, Forced Migration, Iron Curtain:
East European Migration History in the Twentieth Century
Jun. Prof. Dr. Jannis Panagiotidis (Osnabrück)
Thursday, 7 June 2018, 4-6pm, Stephansaal PG

The history of Eastern Europe in the twentieth century is a history of migrations. Many of those were voluntary; others were forced; yet others had to be fought for. They included mass overseas emigration before the First World War, forced resettlement and expulsions during the Second World War, and emigration and flight across the Iron Curtain during the Cold War. While these migrations are usually considered separately in historiography, this talk will take a comprehensive perspective on this continuum of movement, which not only affected the same regions, but also in many instances the same individuals and families.


Political Immigration in State Socialism: Refugees from the Greek Civil War in the GDR and Poland
Julia Reinke (Jena)
Thursday, 14 June 2018, 4-6pm, Stephansaal PG

Historical migration studies for the Cold War period have addressed the subject of flight and exile primarily as an “East-to-West” phenome-non. However, there was also political immigration into the “East”: In the aftermath of the Greek civil war in 1949, up to 100,000 defeated communist partisans and their relatives were given refuge in the states of the emerging “Eastern Bloc”, among them up to 30,000 children. This talk on refugees from the Greek Civil War in the GDR and Poland aims at exploring the refugee policies of these “countries of emigration.”


The Great Unmixing: Refugees, Repatriates and the Definition of Citizenship in the New Poland, 1918-1924
Prof. Keely Stauter-Halsted (Chicago)
Thursday, 21 June, 4-6pm, Stephansaal PG

It is now well-documented that the violence of the Great War spilled over into civilian and para-military life within the successor states of the European land empires following the end of formal hostilities. Much of this armed conflict, including border clashes, pogroms, and urban riots, was aimed at facilitating the creation of ethnically homogeneous states out of a “mixed” population of imperial subjects. What is less understood are the ways that this “unmixing” of ethnic groups occurred in everyday practices, among border guards, local administrators, municipal police, and civilians in all walks of life. This presentation considers how the decisions of individual bureaucrats and the informal practices of civilians, especially with regard to the mobile population of returnees and refugees, helped shape definitions of citizenship and national identity in non-violent ways within the new Polish Republic.


Islam and Catholicism in the Making of the Post-World War I Era:  Pilgrimages to the Haram Al-Sharif and Jasna Góra in Comparative Perspective
Dr. Peter Polak-Springer (Qatar)
Thursday, 5 July 2018, 4-6pm, Stephansaal PG

At the end of World War I, uprisings, revolts, rallies, and mass demonstrations engulfed major urban centers in Europe and the Middle East. Until recently, the intersection between religion and popular religiosity on the one hand and mass politics on the other has received little attention from scholars. Focusing on the shrines and sacred symbolic spaces of Jasna Góra in interwar Poland and the Haram al-Sharif in Mandatory Palestine, this presentation in global and comparative history aims to address the importance of pilgrimages and shrines in the turbulent politics of transition from monarchical empire to successor state. It aims to highlight how as the war’s end brought down governments and put to question long-standing social and political categories and identities, religious leaders and pilgrims—in this case both Muslims and Catholics—seized the opportunity to shape the transition period to their own political and class interests.